Why a Personal Trainer and Nutritionist is the perfect combination

Most personal trainers aren't independently qualified as nutritionists (having studied it only as part of their basic PT qualifications) and the reverse is even more likely. There are some who do choose, and make the effort, to certify as a nutritionist and personal trainer, though. Is it worthwhile for PTs to do so? Let's look at why a trainee might benefit from it.

When you first make the decision to change your lifestyle and get fit, it can seem obvious what you need to do – go to the gym and lift weights, run, and eat properly. However, you may soon discover that there are an infinite number of choices available to you just on the topic of exercise alone.

What is it that you want to achieve? Is it weight or fat loss, strength conditioning, endurance training, or just to look good on the beach? The goal you pick determines what sort of exercises you should be doing, which muscle groups to work on, and how often you should do each set of reps. The newcomer to fitness training doesn’t come equipped with this database and a search on the internet will simply overwhelm, as there are thousands of routines out there, all of which are endorsed by devotees.

Then there’s the choice of style of training. Should you join a spinning class, do aerobics or CrossFit, HIIT, or just lift weights? Without good advice from a seasoned fitness professional it’s very difficult to make the right decision. This is one reason that many people hire a personal trainer, who can steer them in the right direction according to their chosen goals.

Personal training and nutrition summarosed: work out, eat healthy and be awesome

The trainer can not only give hand-tailored workouts for each client, but is also a great source of motivation. Results are not immediate when you start down a fitness path and many people give up before those results start to show. A good PT will constantly encourage his clients and give them the will to continue when things get tough. Then there is the matter of money invested in a series of appointments and the sense of duty in not letting the trainer down by bailing on a session.

However, exercise is only half the equation when it comes to fitness and good health. The other half is nutrition, particularly suited to the exercise regime that you are engaged in. It is said that “You can’t outrun a bad diet,” and you certainly will struggle to achieve any fitness goal on a diet of junk food. Most people know the concept of a "balanced diet" but exactly what does this mean when you’re working out regularly?

If your goal is fat loss, that can only be achieved by a negative calorie balance, when the body has to convert body fat to calories. Do you know how many calories you consume on a daily basis? Just cutting down food intake won’t cut it when you’re working out, as you’ll run out of energy and be unable to build muscle. There has evolved a fairly exact science of dietary needs in relation to strength training in particular and fitness in general. Not only are there overall guidelines for daily eating but more exact requirements for food intake pre- and post-workout in order to gain the most benefit from the exercise session.

Many personal trainers have a basic knowledge of the best foods to eat for working out in general but may not know so much about amino acids, antioxidants, or micro-nutrients. A trained nutritionist would understand the importance of these elements in diet. Also everybody is different, having different body types, different metabolic rates, and different tastes. A one-size-fits-all approach is not the most productive method to achieve the best results in dietary advice for fitness training.

For these reasons the choice of a personal trainer who is also a qualified nutritionist is simply the best solution for anyone who is serious about getting the best and quickest results from their fitness regime. Eat healthy and get fit fast!